December 2019

Found 3 blog entries for December 2019.

A desirable part of the city, Uptown New Orleans was developed during the 1800s, mostly from land that had been plantations. Today, when people speak of Uptown, they’re generally referring to the large area bounded by the Mississippi River, S. Claiborne Avenue, Jackson Avenue and Broadway. There, you’ll find a wide variety of older homes and charming architectural styles, including Shotguns, Creole cottages, Greek Revival homes, Victorian homes, and Craftsman bungalows, just to name a few. Uptown also boasts large green spaces such as Audubon Park, where residents walk, bike, run, and play under 250 year old oak trees. And across from the park, Tulane and Loyola universities draw students from around the country. Mansion after mansion lines historic

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If spending quality time with your family and friends includes cooking meals, eating together, playing games, watching movies and hanging out, a home with an open floor plan is a great choice. With this kind of layout, the kitchen opens onto the dining and living areas, encouraging conversation and a more relaxed living style. It’s especially attractive whether you want to keep an eye on the kids while you’re cooking, or like to chat with guests while you’re making cocktails. Check out these featured listings with lovely open layouts, and imagine the laughter and togetherness they’ll inspire.

2623 Peniston St, New Orleans, LA 70115 

 

3200 Chippewa St, New Orleans, LA 70115 

 

1015 Congress St, New Orleans, LA 70117 

 

921

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Known for its well-preserved historic mansions and beautiful architecture featuring Victorian, Italianate and Classic Greek Revival styles, the Garden District is an early example of a luxury suburb and is roughly bordered by St. Charles Avenue, First Street, Magazine Street and Toledano Street. Originally the Livaudais Plantation, it was sold off in 1832 in smaller parcels of land and developed with a few houses per block. Each home was surrounded by lush grounds and large gardens, and by the 1850s, travel writers dubbed the area the Garden District. As those large lots were subdivided and uptown New Orleans became more urban, the 19th-century mansions were soon surrounded by more modest Victorian houses.

Featuring ornamental wrought iron fences,

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